Everyone are entitled to their views, even if we don’t agree with them. If, and how, they try and impress them on us is the problem.


Having read David Cameron’s speech at Munich Security Conference in full, he seems to make some valid points and some that taken out of context could enrage.

I believe he is right when he says that “extremism” could be a security problem. The mistake I think he makes is by trying nobly to make the distinction using Islam/Muslim’s as an example, although he does mention Ireland as well, briefly.

“That is the existence of an ideology, Islamist extremism.  We should be equally clear what we mean by this term, and we must distinguish it from Islam.  Islam is a religion observed peacefully and devoutly by over a billion people.  Islamist extremism is a political ideology supported by a minority.”

As I have previously said, there will always be radical groups/factions, regardless of how hard we try to isolate them. That is not to say I sympathise or agree that they should exist, in any way.

In an ideal society, we would all ‘get along’ and respect each others views. We also have to be realistic enough to know that will never be the case.

The fact is that age old argument that politics and religion don’t mix well and that extremists of any religion or faction will fight (literally in some cases) against authority. How we deal with that, again, is an age old question, but in my opinion highlighting their plight and giving them a platform and trying to squeeze them out could be counter-productive.

Language is a barrier, which we are right to address. I have seen how perfectly good people can be slated and marked as ineffective just because they can’t be understood, when actually they are better than those who can be conversed with. In that ‘ideal society’ we would all speak the same language fluently, which as someone who has tried and failed at learning modern languages to a decent standard, I realise will never happen totally.

I believe it is good that David Cameron has highlighted the need for awareness of extremism and the danger to our security, but before throwing the rotten eggs I suggest the whole speech is taken in context and not just pick on individual sentences.

Everyone are entitled to their views, even if we don’t agree with them. If, and how, they try and impress them on us is the problem.

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2 thoughts on “Everyone are entitled to their views, even if we don’t agree with them. If, and how, they try and impress them on us is the problem.

  1. I disagree – as I’ve written here. http://carons-musings.blogspot.com/2011/02/dave-finds-his-dog-whistle.html. There may have been snippets of his speech that had a shade of common sense about them, like the language thing, but it was couched in terms I felt quite uncomfortable hearing.

    It’s noticeable to me that Nick Clegg has spent the week tearing down prejudice and stigma with his mental health stuff, while Cameron’s reinforcing Islamophobia.

    Like

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